Emergency partition system – Shigeru Ban Architects

Shigeru Ban is a renowned Japanese architect, recognised for his work using recycled cardboard paper to quickly and efficiently build shelters. His most significant projects include the Normadic Museum Tokyo and Musée d’art Moderne Georges Pompidou in Metz, France.

Paper Partition System was a project initially created to give privacy for families on evacuation sites during the Fukuoka earthquake in 2005.

After the recent disaster happened in Japan, his team is appealing for support to help provide these to the Japanese people.

Emergency Support for JAPAN EARTHQUAKE and TSUNAMI

On March 11, 2011, 9.0-magnitude earthquake struck the Pacific coast of Tohoku, JAPAN.

We are currently preparing to deploy  simple partitions for evacuees taking shelter at gymnasiums in the Tohoku region.

From now on, for people taking shelter in these sites, it is necessary to avoid distress from the lack of privacy and high density.

We ask for your support of this important disaster relief endeavor.

Donations made to the following account are very much appreciated.

Bank:                The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, Ltd.
Branch:             Higashi Matsubara Branch
Account Name:   Voluntary Architects Network
Account No.:       3636723 (Futsuu)
Swift Code:         BOTKJPJT
Bank Address:     5-2-18 Matsubara, Setagaya, Tokyo, Japan

Source / Photos: Shigerubanarchitects.com

Flat light bulb – Joon & Jung

Joon & Jung is a Korean-born design duo based in Eindhoven, Netherlands. Their previous portfolio include conceptual products such as ‘the natural speaker‘, ‘cloud umbrella‘, and ‘i’m too sad to separate cup‘. Recently, they presented ‘flat bulb’ during 100% Design Tokyo.

Photo: designboom.com

Mushroom brush – Iris Hantverk

Iris Hantverk is a Swedish company that produces well-crafted handmade brushes by blind people. They make different types of bristles using traditional methods of the 19th century.

This mushroom brush is perfect for brushing dirt off the delicate fungus before cooking as washing them in water would dilute their flavour and make them go soggy.

Italy towel

An interesting product I discovered on my trip to Korea last month,  this is called ‘Italy towel’. A man who ran a textiles business in the 60’s in Busan, Korea had this 100% viscose fabric first imported from Italy but didn’t have the use for it. Soon, he thought its rough texture might be good to use in bath to scrub off dead skin cells. Since then, this little bright green coloured fabric became a must-have in every Korean household. Although it’s not recommended for everyday use as it may damage delicate skin.